Save the black rhino

Why is the black rhino in danger?

The black rhinoceros was once found throughout sub-Saharan Africa, with hundreds of thousands roaming the continent. However, due to human hunting and poaching, by 1995 only 2,410 remained. The population had been totally savaged and left to quietly die in a war-torn region of the Earth. Unfortunately the animal is now in real danger of following its subspecies, the western black rhinoceros, which has gone entirely extinct.

A 7-month-old orphaned black rhino is cared for by a keeper at the David Sheldrick Wildlife Turst, Nairobi, Kenya.

Luckily, starting in that turbulent year of 1995, the world’s conservation organisations fought back and today the population of the black rhinoceros has recovered – if recovered is the word – to 4,880 individuals, roughly double that of 18 years ago.

Despite this, however, the species still remains very seriously at risk, with a single bad year enough to tip it back into decline. As such, numerous organisations today help fund anti-poaching efforts in many African countries, lobby for additional protective laws and try to help educate the public about the danger being faced.

How can I help save the black rhino?

Unlike many endangered species, the black rhinoceros has now got established programs to help its population recover, with a concentrated effort to halt the slide to extinction over the last decade now bedded in. One of the key players here is the WWF, which does much in the aid of anti-poaching efforts throughout Africa. By donating to the WWF you can therefore help purchase anti-poaching equipment, help it establish protected rhino areas and promote sympathetic tourism. Check out the ways you can donate on the WWF website: wwf.panda.org

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The unmissable ’50 of the world’s most endangered animals’ fature, including information on how you can help, is in Issue 1 of World of Animals magazine. Download a digital version for your here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

* Picture shows a 7-month-old orphaned black rhino is cared for by a keeper at the David Sheldrick Wildlife Turst, Nairobi, Kenya.