Get involved in bat conservation!

Want to get involved in conservation? Here’s a great interactive map from the Bat Conservation Trust!

Although we associate wildlife with open green spaces and the countryside, bats are actually all around us. While many species are able to adapt to life in an urban environment, some species are struggling. Habitat fragmentation is a huge problem. An increase in development, building works, and road networks had split available habitat and made life increasingly difficult. Bats are known the follow linear structures such as woodland and park edges, as lots of insects congregate at these tree lines. However, this natural behaviour has seen bats fly and follow the linear structures of roads and motorways. This means, that when large roads are built through green spaces, bats are unable (or rather, sometimes unwilling) to cross.

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The Nathusius’ pipistrelle is rare in the UK

 

Habitat fragmentation is a huge problem. An increase in development, building works, and road networks had split available habitat and made life increasingly difficult.

By losing their homes and habitat, they are in serious threat. So it’s up to us to save them! By helping contribute to long-term data collection, the BCT are able to spot patterns in the data to find bat activity hotspots to determine which areas and species are most in need of protection.

It’s easier than you would think to get involved. The size of the bat and flight pattern can give you some indication as to which species you are looking at. The BCT has outlined this on their website. Alternatively, there are local bat groups up and down the country that carry out bat walks with bat detectors, which are machines transforming bat echolocation calls into frequencies we can hear. There are over 90 bat groups in the UK alone, it’s possible to find your local one here.

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The bat map is clearly laid out and easy to use

 

By losing their homes and habitat, they are in serious threat. So it’s up to us to save them! By helping contribute to long-term data collection, the BCT are able to spot patterns in the data to find bat activity hotspots to determine which areas and species are most in need of protection.

If you have seen a bat, all you need to do to contribute is head over to the Bat Map, enter your name, email address, and when and where you saw the bat to put your bat on the map!

Bats can be seen just about anywhere, the best times being at sunset and sunrise. Although they hibernate through the winter, they still need to make trips out to get water and can still be seen flying.